NASA Recorded Sound In Space. What You’re About To Hear Is Absolutely Chilling!


We are used to seeing amazing pictures of space thanks to NASA's space program, but have you ever LISTENED to the universe?




New recordings of certain parts of space have been recorded by some of NASA's spacecrafts which have the capability of recording sound waves.




The spaceships are able to so this by recording radio emissions from planetary environments, which are then converted to sound waves.

What you’re hearing here is the result of scientists’ conversion of these radio emissions to sound waves. NASA’s Voyager, INJUN 1, ISEE 1 and HAWKEYE space probes were all used to listen to parts of space, and the fascinating recordings are here.

The recorded sounds are the complex interactions of charged electromagnetic particles from the solar wind, ionisphere, and planetary magnetosphere.

These recordings are the real recordings all the way from space, nothing has been tweaked or altered to make it different or clearer.

You'll be amazed at what space sounds like!



                                                                 Saturn's rings



Miranda (Uranus Moon)



                                                                       Neptune



                                                             Voices of Earth

 


Saturn 









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NASA Recorded Sound In Space. What You’re About To Hear Is Absolutely Chilling! NASA Recorded Sound In Space. What You’re About To Hear Is Absolutely Chilling! Reviewed by C C on 01:44:00 Rating: 5
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